Medical Devices

Significant changes are on the horizon for clinical trials in Germany. At the end of January 2024, the German Federal Health Ministry has presented the draft for a “Medical Research Act” (Medizinforschungsgesetz or MFG). The draft bill proposes legislative amendments in several areas that span from clinical trials, GMP issues for

In a move that is sure to be welcomed by the diagnostics industry, on 23 January 2024, the European Commission announced proposals (Commission proposal and press release) to extend the transitional periods for certain in-vitro-diagnostic medical devices (“IVDs”) under Regulation (EU) 2017/746 (“IVDR”).  This follows similar action taken by the Commission in early 2023 to extend the transitional provisions under Regulation (EU) 2017/745 (the “MDR”) (see our prior blog post here).  The rationale applied for the latest proposal is the same as before – it aims to “ensure availability of safe devices, essential for healthcare systems, and protect patient care”.  Specifically, the latest IVD proposals are intended to address ongoing concerns regarding the availability and readiness of notified bodies to perform IVDR conformity assessments and the high number of IVDs that have yet to transition to the IVDR.  The new proposals (once adopted) will provide manufacturers with more time to comply with the new requirements of the IVDR.  Relatedly, manufacturers will be required to give notice if they foresee interruption of supply of their devices.

In addition, to improve the transparency and coordination, the Commission has proposed to accelerate the roll out of the European database on medical devices (“EUDAMED”) so that certain modules are mandatory as from late 2025.   Continue Reading European Commission Proposes to Extend Transitional Periods for In-Vitro-Diagnostic Medical Devices

The European Parliament and Council are currently negotiating the wording of a new Regulation establishing a Single Market emergency instrument (“SMEI”).  This new measure builds on the experience gained from the COVID-19 crisis and gives new powers to the Commission, in close cooperation with the Member States.  This blog briefly discusses the expected impact on

On October 19, 2023, the World Health Organization (“WHO”) published a set of regulatory considerations on artificial intelligence (“AI”) for health (press release and full publication).  The publication is not guidance or policy but is intended as a resource for relevant stakeholders in medical devices ecosystems, including manufacturers who design and develop AI-embedded

On 19 September 2023, the UK  Government announced the launch of the Innovative Devices Access Pathway (“IDAP”) pilot scheme. The UK already has in place an Innovative Licensing and Access Pathway (“ILAP”) for medicines.  IDAP is the equivalent for medical devices, and is groundbreaking in the UK devices space. 

The IDAP scheme aims to improve

Big news for manufacturers: the UK Government announced on 1 August 2023 that it will indefinitely recognize the EU’s product conformity assessment mark (the “Conformité Européenne” or “CE” mark), with respect to a range of manufactured goods placed on the UK market. 

The move is a significant reversal of the UK’s previous, post‑Brexit policy.  In a bid to separate the UK’s internal market from the European market, the UK promised to phase out CE marks for products marketed in England, Scotland and Wales (Great Britain or “GB”), and replace them with an equivalent “UKCA” mark.  However, the project suffered from numerous delays, and the UK repeatedly extended the deadline for transitioning from the CE mark to the UKCA mark, before the recent announcement that the UK will accept CE marks indefinitely.  Despite this change of policy, the UK has not abandoned the UKCA mark yet, and manufacturers may still choose to use it.  Even so, it is not obvious why a manufacturer would choose conformity assessment that is recognized only in the UK over (or even as well as) conformity assessment that is recognized across the UK and the EU.  What remains to be seen is whether differences between the UK and EU conformity assessment standards will lead to a kind of “forum shopping” by manufacturers. 

Also, and of significant importance for medical device manufacturers, the indefinite extension of CE mark recognition does not (at least currently) cover medical devices nor in vitro diagnostic medical devices (“IVDs”).  The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (“MHRA”) is separately consulting on international recognition of foreign approvals (including CE marks) in the medical device space.Continue Reading UK Government to Recognize CE Marks Indefinitely (other than for Medical Devices and IVDs)