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Peter Bogaert

Peter Bogaert has a broad European life sciences practice. He has detailed regulatory expertise under EU and national laws, handles legislative and other policy assignments and provides strategic advice. He also represents life sciences companies before the EU Courts in Luxembourg and in local litigation in Belgium. Peter's practice covers pharmaceuticals, biotechnology, medical devices, special foods and feed, cosmetics and other consumer products and he represents numerous innovative life sciences companies, including start-ups, as well as several industry associations.

Chambers Global notes that a client said: “He is an extremely experienced professional with broad expertise and provides sensible and well-balanced solutions." He is consistently ranked by PLC as one of the leading life sciences lawyers globally and Legal 500 EMEA and Chambers Europe note Peter's prominent regulatory pharmaceutical and environmental practice. Legal 500 EME noted that he is "a superb lawyer who is very pleasant to work with." Peter regularly writes and speaks on life sciences issues. He is a founding member of the Brussels Pharma Law Group and also served for fifteen years as Managing Partner of the firm’s Brussels office.

On 10 April 2024, the European Parliament adopted its position on the Commission proposal to reform the core EU pharmaceutical legislation (see here and here).  In doing so, the European Parliament has met its ambitious timeline to adopt its position before the upcoming Parliamentary elections and marks a significant step in the legislative process. 

Parliament’s position comes less than a year since the Commission published its proposal, which consists of a new directive replacing Directive 2001/83/EC and a new master regulation replacing Regulation 726/2004, which will also consolidate the orphan and pediatric medicines regulations (see our prior EU Pharma Legislation Review blog series).  Many of Parliament’s amendments to the Commission proposal will be seen as improvements by the innovative industry, but there remain challenges and unresolved questions.

We provide below the top 8 takeaways for industry to consider during the next phase of the legislative process, which is a detailed review by the Council.Continue Reading European Parliament adopts its Position on EU Pharma Law Review: 8 Key Takeaways for Industry

The European Commission (the “Commission”) wants to “avoid unnecessary administrative and financial burdens for applicants and competent authorities.”  As such, the Commission’s proposal for a revised Directive on the Union Code Relating to Medicinal Products for Human Use (the “Directive”) retains the Decentralized Procedure (“DCP”) and Mutual Recognition Procedure (“MRP”).  Chapter III of

The EU’s latest draft pharmaceutical legislation contains some interesting developments on transparency matters, both in relation to access to documents and transparency around the funding of research and development of medicinal products.

1. Draft Regulation – Further Clarity Regarding Public Access to Documents

Disclosure of documents in response to an access request under the EU

The European Commission has proposed specific measures to increase the supervision and monitoring of the use of antimicrobial medicinal products (or “antimicrobials”), with the aim to counter the spread of antimicrobial resistance (“AMR”).  At the same time, the measures are also aimed at promoting and incentivizing the development of new priority antimicrobials through the use

The existing EU pharmaceutical legislation provides for a number of specific exemptions from the marketing authorisation requirement, including products supplied on a named patient or compassionate use bases; products compounded and dispensed in pharmacies (magistral and officinal formulations) and also for products necessary to respond to public health emergencies.  Given that a key policy goal

More Obligations for the Same Reward?

On 26 April 2023, the European Commission published its long awaited proposal to revise the EU’s general pharmaceutical legislation.  As expected, the Commission’s proposal represents a significant overhaul of the EU medicine rules.  Not least the incorporation of the EU’s amended paediatric and orphan medicine rules into a single

On 26 April 2023, the European Commission published its long awaited proposal to revise the EU pharmaceutical legislation.  The proposal includes a new draft Regulation, which will repeal Regulation (EC) No 726/2004, the Orphan Medicines Regulation 141/2000 and the Paediatric Regulation 1901/2006.

As expected, the draft Regulation significantly shakes up incentives available to the

This is the first in a series of Covington blogs about the EU’s proposals to amend the current pharmaceutical regulatory framework, which were released today (see here).  It introduces some of the key aims and themes and invites readers to read more in-depth summaries as we release them. 

The proposals have been in

Tune into the first episode of Covington’s Talking Life Sciences Audiocast, where Grant Castle, Peter Bogaert and Marie Doyle-Rossi discuss key developments and trends in the pharma sector. Our speakers review the major issues of 2022, including the Clinical Trials Regulation, the Health Technology Assessment Regulation, European Health Data Space proposal and Brexit.

On 1 July 2021, the new French rules on early access to unauthorized medicinal products and off-label use of authorized medicinal products entered into force.  The rules were introduced by the Social Security Financing Law for 2021 (LOI n° 2020-1576 du 14 décembre 2020 de financement de la sécurité sociale pour 2021 or “LFSS 2021”, available here).  The reform seeks to simplify existing rules, make early access and off-label use more predictable for all users, and ensure the sustainability of these programs for the public health insurance system.  In this blog, we present an overview of the new rules.
Continue Reading New Early Access and Off-Label Use Rules in France