Medical Devices

On May 21, 2024, the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (“MHRA”) published a statement of policy intent for UK recognition of international regulatory approvals of certain medical devices (the “Statement”).  The Statement follows the Government response to the 2021 consultation on the future regulation of medical devices in the UK that details an intention to introduce alternative routes to market for medical devices, such as utilizing approvals from other countries and Medical Device Single Audit Program (“MDSAP”) certificates, in addition to the current UK Conformity Assessed (“UKCA”) marking process.

The MHRA has already taken similar steps in the medicines space, adopting a new International Recognition Procedure (“IRP”) in January 2024.

In relation to devices, the Statement applies to certain medical devices placed on the market in Great Britain.  For relevant devices, the MHRA proposes to recognize foreign approvals from regulators in Australia, Canada, EU/EEA and USA (which is a smaller number of acceptable regulators than under the MHRA’s IRP for medicines).  The Statement expressly excludes a number of medical devices from international recognition, including software as a medical device (“SaMD”) (including AI as a medical device (“AIaMD”)) and companion diagnostic products approved via US 510(k) (a route which relies on equivalence to a predicate).

The proposed framework is a draft and the final version is expected to come into force in 2025 at the same time as future core regulations.  It also remains the government’s intention to introduce transitional arrangements for UKCA marked devices at the same time.Continue Reading UK MHRA Announces Intention To Recognize Certain International Approvals For Certain Medical Devices

On April 30, 2024, the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (“MHRA”) outlined its strategic approach (“Approach”) to artificial intelligence (“AI”).  The Approach is a response to the UK Government’s white paper: a pro-innovation approach to AI regulation and subsequent Secretary of State letter of 1 February 2024, and is the culmination of 12 months’ work by the MHRA to ensure the risks of AI are appropriately balanced with the potential transformative impact of AI in healthcare.

AI in Healthcare

AI has the potential to revolutionize the healthcare sector and improve health outcomes at every stage of healthcare provision – from preventative care through to diagnosis and treatment.  AI can help in research and development by strengthening outcomes of clinical trials, as well as being used to improve the clinical care of patients by personalizing care, improving diagnosis and treatment, enhancing the delivery of care and health system efficiency, and supplementing healthcare professionals’ knowledge, skills and competencies. Continue Reading MHRA Outlines New Strategic Approach to Artificial Intelligence

Last week (28 March 2024), the UK Health Research Authority (“HRA”) published a draft model investigator-initiated study agreement (“mIIS-CTA”) to govern investigator-initiated clinical studies (“IIS”) that involve NHS patients and receive support from commercial partners.  The HRA is calling for comments on the draft mIIS-CTA by 13 May 2024.Continue Reading UK HRA Consults on a New Model Investigator-Initiated Study Agreement

The European Union has adopted various new rules for emergency situations relating to public health.  These new measures build on the experience gained from the COVID-19 pandemic and give new powers to the European Commission, in close cooperation with the Member States. 

The new rules create a complex public health crisis management system.  Measures that

The European Parliament and Council are currently negotiating the wording of a new Regulation establishing a Single Market emergency instrument (“SMEI”).  This new measure builds on the experience gained from the COVID-19 crisis and gives new powers to the Commission, in close cooperation with the Member States.  This blog briefly discusses the expected impact on

On 19 September 2023, the UK  Government announced the launch of the Innovative Devices Access Pathway (“IDAP”) pilot scheme. The UK already has in place an Innovative Licensing and Access Pathway (“ILAP”) for medicines.  IDAP is the equivalent for medical devices, and is groundbreaking in the UK devices space. 

The IDAP scheme aims to improve

Germany’s hospital system is reported to be of high quality but is also very expensive by international standards. Hospitals and healthcare payers such as health insurances are exposed to increasing economic constraints. One particular point of criticism is, for example, the current system of Diagnosis Related Group (DRG)-based fees.

Patient treatments are compensated based on the DRGs which effectively leads to a lump-sum payment system per diagnosis (with certain exemptions). This system has pros and cons. As a downside, it is reported to create incentives for over-treatments to generate DRG-based fees per patient.

At the same time, many hospitals in Germany are at risk of closure and insolvency due to financial challenges. The German federal states have thus asked the federal government for financial support to finance the restructuring of the hospital system and prevent hospitals from bankruptcy.Continue Reading Germany plans significant hospital reform with broad impact on life sciences companies

On 26 May 2023 the UK’s Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) announced it plans to introduce an international reliance route for the approval of medicinal products.  This shows the UK is now looking beyond the EU in its approach to recognizing foreign marketing authorizations.  The MHRA is “focused on providing

Borderline issues arise when the regulatory classification of a product, for example, as a medicine, a medical device or a food supplement, is unclear.  Uncertainty about the regulatory status of a product under development, and consequently uncertainty as to what legal rules need to be followed, can have immense consequences for developers and innovators.  To

In this episode of Covington’s Life Sciences Audiocast, Sarah Cowlishaw and Ellie Handy discuss the recent changes to the MDR and IVDR.  Our speakers discuss the European Commission’s recently adopted Regulation (EU) 2023/607, which extends the transitional periods in the EU Medical Devices Regulation (EU) 2017/745 (the “MDR”) for certain eligible devices CE marked