The UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (“MHRA”) has published Guidance on the regulation of medical devices from 1 January 2021 (the “Guidance”).  It discusses the regulatory requirements that apply to medical devices after the end of the Brexit transitional period under the EU-UK Withdrawal Agreement.  In summary:

  • From 1 January 2021, different rules

On 26 February, the UK’s Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) published further guidance (available here) setting out the anticipated regulation of medical devices in the UK, should the UK leave the EU without a deal (Guidance).  This Guidance will apply from ‘exit day’ (expected to be 11 p.m. 29 March 2019) subject to the (currently draft) Medical Devices (Amendment) (EU Exit) Regulations 2019 (UK MDR 2019) (available here) being passed by UK Parliament. This latest Guidance follows on from the MHRA’s previous ‘no deal’ scenario further guidance note in January regarding medicines, medical devices and clinical trials regulation (available here).

  1. Legislative Background

The Medical Devices Regulations 2002 (UK MDR 2002) implement Directives 90/385/EEC, 93/42/EEC and 98/79/EC on active implantable medical devices, medical devices, and in vitro diagnostic medical devices (IVDs), respectively (EU Directives) into UK law.  Pursuant to the European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2018, the UK MDR 2002 will continue to apply.


Continue Reading UK regulator provides further ‘no deal’ Brexit guidance for medical devices regulation

In February 2014, the MHRA published new guidance on borderline medical devices.  The guidance considers only medical devices within the terms of the Medical Device Directive and not the Active Implantable Medical Devices Directive or In Vitro Medical Devices Directive.

Purpose and mode of action

The MHRA makes clear that borderline determinations “will be based on the stated intended purpose of the product and its mode of action.”  The intended purpose will be determined by the labelling, instructions for use, and promotional material for the medical device.  However, the governing factor in assessing whether a product is a medical device or medicinal product is the mode of action of the product concerned.

Application to products

The guidance provides examples of borderline devices across a number of categories, including medicines, sport and leisure products, personal protection equipment, software, machinery, spare parts, second-hand devices, and custom-made devices.
Continue Reading New MHRA Guidance on Borderline Medical Devices