Article originally published in the Food Packaging Bulletin, January 2010

As with virtually all goods manufactured in, or imported into, the European Economic AreaI, food packaging is subject to the stringent requirements of Regulation (EC) No. 1907/2006 on the Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals (the so-called “REACH Regulation”)II. Indeed, while substances “used in food” are excluded from most of the REACH requirements, this is not the case for substances used in the manufacture of food packaging or from which food packaging is made.

The REACH Regulation applies to substances on their own and in mixtures, as well as to substances in so-called “articles”. Articles are objects, such as packaging, that during production are given a special shape, surface or design that determines their function to a greater degree than their chemical composition.

REACH is characterized by the following features: First, for virtually all substances, REACH imposes the principle of “no data, no market” and requires producers to learn about and disclose the substances that are contained in their products and their properties.

Read the complete article here

Print:
Email this postTweet this postLike this postShare this post on LinkedIn
Photo of Cándido García Molyneux Cándido García Molyneux

Cándido García Molyneux is a Spanish of counsel in the Brussels office of Covington & Burling.  His practice focuses on EU environmental law, renewable energies, and international trade law.  He advises clients on legal issues concerning environmental product regulation, emissions trading, renewable energies…

Cándido García Molyneux is a Spanish of counsel in the Brussels office of Covington & Burling.  His practice focuses on EU environmental law, renewable energies, and international trade law.  He advises clients on legal issues concerning environmental product regulation, emissions trading, renewable energies, energy efficiency, shale gas, chemical law, product safety, waste management, and international trade law and non-tariff trade barriers.  Mr. García Molyneux was very much involved in the legislative process that led to the revision and amendment of the ETS Directive and Renewable Energies Directive.  He is an external professor of environmental law and policy at the College of Europe.