Germany

In an earlier blog, we wrote that the German regulation of pharmaceutical pricing and reimbursement is one of the most complicated legal areas in the entire world of life sciences laws. With the new draft “Medical Research Act” (Medizinforschungsgesetz or MFG) that came out in January 2024, the German government

Significant changes are on the horizon for clinical trials in Germany. At the end of January 2024, the German Federal Health Ministry has presented the draft for a “Medical Research Act” (Medizinforschungsgesetz or MFG). The draft bill proposes legislative amendments in several areas that span from clinical trials, GMP issues for

The German government is discussing a new Pharma Strategy with a number of reforms to improve the conditions for the pharmaceutical industry in Germany. Recently, the “Strategy Paper 4.0 – Improving the General Conditions for the Pharmaceutical Sector in Germany” (original title: Strategiepapier 4.0: Verbesserung der Rahmenbedingungen für den Pharmabereich in Deutschland – Handlungskonzepte für den Forschungs- und Produktionsstandort) became public that reportedly has the backing of the German Chancellor and the Federal Health Minister.

This strategy paper presents a range of measures to strengthen, among other things, pharmaceutical research and production in Germany and to improve the market access and pricing environment. These measures would have a significant impact for a multitude of players in the life sciences field. As such, the German government anticipates faster approvals for clinical trials, faster access to innovative medicines, more digitalization, greater supply security, a more investment-friendly environment and reduction of bureaucracy. Currently, and this is widely acknowledged by the government and most stakeholders, there is significant room for improvement in all of these areas.Continue Reading German Government pursues new Pharma Strategy with significant Reform Ideas

Germany’s hospital system is reported to be of high quality but is also very expensive by international standards. Hospitals and healthcare payers such as health insurances are exposed to increasing economic constraints. One particular point of criticism is, for example, the current system of Diagnosis Related Group (DRG)-based fees.

Patient treatments are compensated based on the DRGs which effectively leads to a lump-sum payment system per diagnosis (with certain exemptions). This system has pros and cons. As a downside, it is reported to create incentives for over-treatments to generate DRG-based fees per patient.

At the same time, many hospitals in Germany are at risk of closure and insolvency due to financial challenges. The German federal states have thus asked the federal government for financial support to finance the restructuring of the hospital system and prevent hospitals from bankruptcy.Continue Reading Germany plans significant hospital reform with broad impact on life sciences companies

In an earlier blog, we noted that the German drug pricing and reimbursement laws are among the most complicated legal areas in the entire field of life sciences law. Now, these laws and the respective German market access rules are becoming more complicated. A new law will come into effect in the next few weeks.Continue Reading Germany to enact new law with significant changes to drug pricing and reimbursement rules

At the end of June 2023, a draft Health Data Use Act (“GDNG”) and a draft Digital Act (“DigiG”) of the German Federal Ministry of Health have become public. These drafts are part of the German government’s digitalization strategy for the health sector. The Health Data Use Act plans to grant industry companies an access right to patient health data for research purposes. The Digital Act envisages significant restrictions for the pricing and reimbursement of Digital Health Apps. Below, we summarize key aspects of these two legislation proposals.Continue Reading Germany plans Health Data Use Act and stricter pricing & reimbursement rules for Digital Health Apps

On 14 February 2023, the German Federal Ministry of Health (BMG) has presented the new draft “Act to Combat Supply Shortages of Off-Patent Medicines and to Improve the Supply of Paediatric Medicines” (Arzneimittel-Lieferengpassbekämpfungs- und Versorgungsverbesserungsgesetz or ALBVVG”). Some commentators also refer to the new law as the “Generics Act” but

The German regulation of pricing and reimbursement of pharmaceuticals is probably one of the most complicated legal areas in the entire world of life sciences laws. Now, the German government is adding another layer of complexity to the existing rules.

On 20 October 2022, the German Parliament has accepted the draft Act for the Financial Stabilization of the German Statutory Health Insurance System („GKV-FinStG“). The new act was subject to month-long controversial discussions within and outside of the Parliament and affected stakeholders. This was due to the fact that the new rules will affect almost all players within the healthcare system, including the health insurers, doctors, hospitals, pharmacies and, especially, the pharmaceutical industry. The new law encompasses significant cost-containment measures as the German healthcare system faces increased costs while, at the same time, the system suffers from a reduced inflow of funds.Continue Reading Germany significantly tightens Drug Pricing and Reimbursement Laws

Following the federal election in September 2021, Germany will soon be led by a new three-party coalition, the so-called “traffic light coalition”, composed of the Social Democratic Party (SPD), the Liberal Democrats (FDP) and the Green Party (Die Grünen). This new federal government led by the new chancellor Olaf Scholz from the Social Democrats will replace the Merkel administration and will be in office for four years. On November 24, 2021, the new coalition has presented their coalition agreement with their plans for the next 4 years. The agreement needs to be approved by the respective party committees and it is expected that all three parties will approve it.Continue Reading New German Government plans significant changes with Impact on the Healthcare, Life Sciences and Food Sector

On 6 May 2021, the European Food Safety Authority (“EFSA”) published its updated safety assessment on titanium dioxide as a food additive (E171). EFSA examined new evidence on nanoparticles and found that there was uncertainty about E171’s ability to accumulate in the body and damage genetic material in cells; i.e. genotoxicity. The agency could not calculate an Acceptable Daily Intake (“ADI”), nor could it determine a safe cut-off value for particle size and distribution. On that basis, it could not confirm the safety of E171 in food. However, since it found no evidence of acute toxicity, an immediate ban is not warranted. France previously initiated a national ban in 2019/2020; following EFSA’s revised opinion, the EU is likely to adopt an EU-wide ban early 2022. In this blog, we briefly review the planned EU-level response and the developments in the Netherlands, Germany and the UK.Continue Reading EU Plans Ban on Titanium Dioxide in Food