Lucie Klabackova is a Trainee Solicitor who attended the University of Law and BPP Law School.

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On 4 January 2018, the European Commission published a draft implementing regulation laying down rules for the application of Article 26(3) of Regulation (EU) N° 1169/2011 of the European Parliament and of the Council on the provision of food information to consumers (“FIC”), as regards the rules for indicating the country of origin

On 14 July 2016, the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) issued its decision in Case C-19/15 Verband Sozialer Wettbewerb v Innova Vital GmbH on the application of the Nutrition and Health Claims Regulation 1924/2006 (“NHCR”) to business-to-business (“B2B”) commercial communications.  The CJEU ruled that B2B communications that were promotional in nature came under the scope of the NHCR even though they are not specifically directed at “the final consumer”.
Continue Reading B2B or not B2B: Application of the NHCR to Business-to-Business Commercial Communications

The UK has enacted new legislation to address the issue of so-called ‘legal highs’ following a number of cases of paranoia, seizures, hospitalisation and even death after consumption of certain psychoactive substances.  The Psychoactive Substances Act 2016 (the “Act”) was granted Royal Assent on 28 January 2016.  It is expected to come into force on 6 April 2016.  The Act makes it an offence to produce, supply, offer to supply, possess with intent to supply, possess in a custodial institution, import or export psychoactive substances.
Continue Reading The Psychoactive Substances Act 2016: An Example of Poor Drafting and Unintended Consequences for Food?

A new Novel Food Regulation (EU) 2015/2283 (“Regulation”) was published in the Official Journal of the European Union on 11 December 2015. The Regulation aims to make it easier for food business operators to place novel foods and food ingredients on the EU market, while ensuring high level of consumer protection.

Under the Regulation, novel food is defined as food that has not been consumed to any significant degree in the EU before May 1997 (when the first novel food legislation entered into force). This can be newly developed, innovative food or food produced using new technologies and production processes as well as food traditionally eaten outside of the EU. The definition now also includes food consisting of engineered nanomaterials and derived from animal clones. The Regulation also makes it clear that insects can fall under the definition of a novel food. The Regulation introduces the following main changes:
Continue Reading New Novel Foods Regulation: A Step Towards a Simpler and Faster Procedure?